11.8 Headache or facial pain attributed to inflammation of the stylohyoid ligament

Previously used term:

Eagle’s syndrome.

Description:

Unilateral headache, with neck, pharyngeal and/or facial pain, caused by inflammation of the stylohyoid ligament and usually provoked or exacerbated by head turning.

Diagnostic criteria:
  1. Any head, neck, pharyngeal and/or facial pain fulfilling criterion C1
  2. Radiological evidence of calcified or elongated stylohyoid ligament
  3. Evidence of causation demonstrated by at least two of the following:
    1. pain is provoked or exacerbated by digital palpation of the stylohyoid ligament
    2. pain is provoked or exacerbated by head turning
    3. pain is significantly improved by injection of local anaesthetic agent into the stylohyoid ligament, or by styloidectomy
    4. pain is ipsilateral to the inflamed stylohyoid ligament
  4. Not better accounted for by another ICHD-3 diagnosis.
Note:

11.8 Headache or facial pain attributed to inflammation of the stylohyoid ligament is generally perceived in the oropharynx, neck and/or face, but some patients experience more diffuse headache.